Civil Rights Infographic (1921-1960)

Infographic Exposing the Dark Racial Past of the Democrat Party, and the Civil Rights Leadership of the Republican Party.

1 “Lynching had become so common in the United States, especially in the South, that in 1921 Representative L. C. Dyer of Missouri introduced a bill in the House of Representatives to make lynching a federal crime.

Dyer acted out of conscience but also at the strong behest of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The bill passed the House, but Southerners in the Senate organized a filibuster that prevented a vote, resulting in the measure’s failure and leaving the states to deal with the lynching problem.”

NOTE: NAACP website (quote above) discusses the anti-lynching bill, but fails to mention the party (Republican) that passed it, or the party (Democrat) that stopped it in the Senate. The truth about the parties is clear!

2 “Democratic Convention of 1924, known to history as the “Klanbake.”

The 103-ballot convention was held in Madison Square Garden. Hundreds of delegates were members of the Ku Klux Klan, the Klan so powerful (within the Democrat Party) that a plank condemning Klan violence was defeated outright.

To celebrate, the Klan staged a rally with 10,000-hooded Klansmen in a field in New Jersey directly across the Hudson from the site of the convention. Attended by hundreds of cheering convention delegates, the rally featured burning crosses and calls for violence against African-Americans and Catholics.”

Photo: The 1924 Democratic National Convention, held at the Madison Square Garden in New York City, infamously known as the “Klanbake”.

2 San Diego Union Tribune

October 3, 1924 Republicans denounce three-time Democrat presidential nominee William Jennings Bryan for defending the Ku Klux Klan at 1924 Democratic National Convention”

Cover Page of 1923 Rosewood, Florida Violence Report, published 22 Dec 1993.

“The Rosewood Massacre was a violent, racially motivated massacre of blacks and destruction of a black town that took place during the first week of January 1923 in rural Levy County, Florida. At least six blacks and two whites were killed, and the town of Rosewood was abandoned and destroyed in what contemporary news reports characterized as a race riot.”

The Rosewood Massacre is almost certainly another example of racist democrats attacking blacks in the south. There is absolutely NO mention in the Rosewood Report of political parties. It is sadly typical of the historical whitewashing going on in America today. A lengthy search of the internet could not find the political parties of any of the known people involved, such as Sheriff Robert Alias Walker.

The Klan, the militant arm of the democrat party, was immensely powerful in Florida during this period, as it was throughout the southern states. The Klan’s revival ignited by President Woodrow Wilson. Reports show that many klan members were present during the massacre.

Given the Democrat Party’s “Klanbake” which occurred a year later, there is little doubt that the “white people” mentioned in the report were democrats, as they were during the Wilmington Race Riot.

Typical comments from the report, which show the lengths the authors went to avoid showing the party affiliations of those culpable, and to place the blame on “America” in general:

  • “The failure of elected white officials to take forceful actions to protect the safety and property of local black residents was part of a pattern in the state and throughout the region.
  • Local and state officials failed to intervene to protect black citizens, and in each incident several innocent blacks were killed and their property destroyed. The same was true in other southern states where rape and black resistance were not tolerated by white residents and were seen as a legitimate excuse to abandon the law in favor of brute force.
  • Pleas from citizens and their spokesmen fell on deaf ears, and Florida’s white leadership responded to the civil and racial unrest only when it threatened to jeopardize the state’s economic advancement.
  • Like the racial violence innumerous other communities throughout Florida and the South during this era, Rosewood was a tragedy of American democracy and the American legal system.”

1928: First Hispanic U.S. Senator, Senator Octaviano Larrazolo (R-NM), sworn in.

June 12, 1929: “First Lady Lou Hoover (R) invites wife of U.S. Rep. Oscar De Priest (R-IL), an African-American, to tea at the White House, sparking protests by Democrats across the country”

3 Hillary’s America

1933 – Up to this year, every single black member of the US Congress was Republican.

Note the massive swing in House Control from Republican to Democrat in the chart below, which remained largely in Democrat Party control until 1995. The Senate follows the same pattern.

US House Party Majorities - Note The Impacts From The Great Depression (1931-1941), and The New Deal

US House Party Majorities – Note The Democrat Majorities Stemming From The Great Depression (1931-1941), and The New Deal

1930s – Two major events occurred that change the allegiance of most blacks in America from Republican to Democrat (the Great Depression, and the New Deal, which served as the newest Democrat enslavement program). By the end of the 1930, the vast majority had switched parties.

  • This occurred long before the “Dixicrats” rose up, and returned to the Democrat Party, or the Democrat party’s 1965 Civil Rights Act filibuster.

1937 – FDR (Democrat) rams through Senator Hugo Black’s (D) Alabama SCOTUS nomination in only a few days before any vetting could occur.

  • Story of Justice Black’s KKK history broke soon after his confirmation. The Democrat Party “circled the wagons around him” attacking those who exposed Black’s racist history. Wrong on Race

4 1940 “Republican Party Platform calls for integration of the armed forces; however, Democrat President Franklin Delano Roosevelt refused to order it.”

April 3, 1944 – U.S. Supreme Court strikes down Texas Democratic Party’s whites only primary election system

1948 – “Dixiecrats” rise from the Democrat Party, and returned back to it after the Presidential Election of 1948.

1948: Party Platforms

  • Republican: We are opposed to the idea of racial segregation in the armed services of the United States. We favor the abolition of the poll tax as a requisite to voting. Lynching or any other form of mob violence anywhere is a disgrace to any civilized state, and we favor the prompt enactment of legislation to end this infamy.
  • Democratic Party: Silent on all three.

1949 – Margaret Chase Smith (R-ME) becomes the first woman to serve in both the Senate and the House of Representatives.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s (R) Administration (1953-1961)

See Infographic Above For Additional Civil Rights Actions:

1953 – California’s 3-term Republican Governor Earl Warren, who was also the 1948 Republican Vice-Presidential Nominee and later the Chief Supreme Court Justice, wrote the landmark decision in Brown V. Board of Education banning segregation in public schools. Justice Warren was appointed by President Eisenhower (R).

1956 – “Until 1956 when he (Martin Luther King Jr.) registered as a Republican, every Civil Rights law hand been introduced and passed by Republicans in opposition by the Democrats.” Stolen History

1956 – Republican federal judge Frank Johnson rules in favor of Rosa Parks in decision striking down Alabama’s segregation law that forced blacks to sit in the back of buses. Civil Rights leaders Martin Luther King, JR. and Ralph Abernathy vote for Republican Dwight Eisenhower for President. Stolen History

NOTE: President Eisenhower had already banned such segregation on interstate busses!

March 12, 1956 – Ninety-seven Democrats in Congress condemn Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education, and pledge to continue segregation

1959 First Asian-American U.S. Senator, Hiram Fong (R-HI), is seated

2 thoughts on “Civil Rights Infographic (1921-1960)

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